Black cap that extends below eyes, down nape; pale gray upperparts that are darker at the wingtips; short, stout black bill and black legs, feet; long wings with very long outer primaries. Legs and feet are black. Female is brown-scaled overall with dull blue shoulder patch, dark eyes and pale edged upper mandible. The sexes are similar; males are slightly larger. Legs and feet are gray black. The throat (gorget) is iridescent copper-red. Feeds on fish, crustaceans, carrion, eggs, insects, larvae,fruits and berries. Belly has dull white center; white undertail coverts. Black-throated Gray Warbler: Small warbler, black-marked, slate-gray upperparts, black streaks on flanks, white underparts. The herring gull prefers to lay eggs in sheltered ground or roof locations with minimal nest construction, though parent birds will line the nest site with weeds, grass, or seaweed. Soars on thermals or updrafts. Direct flight on rapid wing beats. Bell's Vireo: Small vireo, faint, broken eye-ring, thick, slightly flattened hooked bill, one or two faint wing bars. Rapid direct flight, often low over the water. Nelson's Sparrow: Small sparrow with brown streaked upperparts. Flight is swift and swallow like, with rapid wing beats, quick movements and turns. Learn to Identify Birds in Tennessee! We’ve found some bugs that call Tennessee their home, JUST like you. Face, sides of rump, underparts are white. Eats seeds, insects, caterpillars. Long bill, slightly upcurved and pink with black tip. Common Ground-Dove: Small, rounded dove with plain gray-brown back and scaled pink-gray head and breast. Wings are dark gray with two rust-brown bars. Speculum is blue-green bordered with black and fine white bars. Whatbird.com logo design courtesy of The Haller Company. They are easily recognized by their large size, ear tufts, and yellow eyes. While the birds in the Northeast typically fly south for the winter, the Dark-eyed Junco spends the breeding season in Canada and Alaska. Eats seeds, insects, caterpillars. The long tail is buff-and-black barred, and has a pale tip; undertail coverts are white with black bars. Pink-gray legs and feet. Flight is direct and powerful with deep, slow wing beats. Feeds on marine worms and insects. Direct, swift flight on rapidly beating wings. The sexes look very similar. Neotropic Cormorant: Small, long-tailed cormorant. Greater White-fronted Goose: This medium-sized goose has a dark-brown body and the underparts are barred and flecked with black. As it hops, it often flicks its tail from side to side. Head has spiky, black crest and cap, and heavy, bright orange bill. Bugs. Strong direct flight with rapid wing beats. Forages in trees and bushes. Legs and feet are black. Diet includes fish, insects and birds. Eyes are red. Dull but rather cute flycatcher, with large white-framed eyes. Listen for its rush-and-jumble song in summer and you’ll find this species zipping through shrubs and low tree branches, snatching at insects. House Sparrow Strong direct flight with powerful rapid wing beats. Most common swan in North America. Wings are black with white spots. The brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) is a small obligate brood parasitic icterid native to temperate and subtropical North America. Wings have two bars: upper bar is yellow, lower bar is white. Thin, pale bill. It dives for food, primarily mollusks and crustaceans. White eye-ring is broken and slate gray hood extends to upper breast where it darkens to black. Tail is forked; legs and feet are dark gray. They are also what many of us think of when we think of owls because they are in so many pictures and seem to be very photogenic. Swift direct flight. Snow Bunting: Medium-sized, strikingly white sparrow with black back, central tail, and wing tips. It feeds mostly on insects. Tail is brown with white edges. Diet includes insects and worms. Breast and sides are pale brown with pale streaks; throat, belly, and undertail coverts are white. Wilson's Plover: Medium plover, gray-brown upperparts and cap. The sexes are similar in appearance. Throat feathers are long, purple-red, appearing as streaks on a white background, whiskers when fluffed out, or dark, inverted V when folded. Legs and feet are black. Monk Parakeet: Medium parakeet, green overall, gray forehead, cheeks, lores, throat. They are permanent residents in the southern parts of their range; northern birds migrate to the southern United States and Mexico in winter, returning to their summer habitat around March or April. Feeds in shallow water or mudflats exposed at low tide. Direct, swift flight on rapidly beating wings. Undertail coverts are white. Bill is very long, decurved. As it hops, it often flicks its tail from side to side. Lower breast and sides are yellow with black streaks and belly is white.Face is yellow with black crown and cheek patch and yellow crescent below eye. It has a heavy direct flight with strong wing beats. The Brown Creeper can be difficult to spot for two reasons: its brown streaked plumage camouflages well and it inconspicuously creeps along the trunks of trees. It is the state bird of Colorado. It was last seen in the United States in 1962, when it was recorded near Charlestown, South Carolina. Bill is olive-brown with fine black tip. Flies in straight line and V formation. Black tail, deeply notched. In winter, found statewide, often in mixed species foraging flocks. Dark brown above and white below with a gray head, brown flanks, and two distinct dark “moustache” lines. Brown coloured birds are found in most families of bird species, including sparrows, thrashers, creepers, and even the females of the different members of the bunting family. Clapper Rail: Large, noisy marsh bird, gray or brown upperparts, vertical white-barred flanks and belly, buff or rust-brown breast. Wings are black with large white patches. Long, thin, upcurved bill. Bill is long, thin, and dull olive-yellow. Sexes are similar. Yellow crown is bordered by a wide black cap; cheek and collar are black. It has a long pink bill with a black tip that is slightly upcurved. Magnificent Frigatebird: Large black seabird, orange throat patch inflates into a huge bright red-orange balloon when in courtship display. Black-headed Grosbeak: Large, stocky finch, black-streaked, orange-brown back, black head, wings, tail. Sexes similar. Feeds on aquatic insects. In winter, the bird is brown with black wings. December through February is the winter for birds. Mask is black with white border, bill is heavy and slightly hooked. Flies close to the water in straight line. Young Cooper's Hawk has a brown back, long banded tail and brown streaks on a light chest. Bill, legs, and feet are gray. Rapid bouncy flight, alternates several quick wing beats with wings pulled to sides. Black-colored--or at least mostly black-colored--birds in the yard tend to be one of these: European Starling, Common Grackle, Red-winged Blackbird, and Brown-headed Cowbird. Here are 10 of the most eye-catching species of beautiful Tennessee birds: 1. Legs and feet are black. Sexes are similar. It has a swift and direct flight. Forages on shore; sometimes probes mud. Black legs, feet. Upperwings are dark edged. Legs are extremely long and red-pink. Head and underparts are buff to cinnamon with white throat and vent. Legs and feet are gray. Feeds while wading in shallow water, sweeping its bill back and forth. Whatbird parametric search. Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Their breeding habitat is wooded areas across northern Canada and the west coast of North America from Alaska to California. Vaux's Swift: Small swift, gray-brown body, sometimes highlighted by slight green iridescence. Wings are black with white patches. Lark Bunting: Large sparrow, nearly black with large white wing patches, short, white-edged tail, and heavy, blue-gray bill. The head and neck are black. Brant: This small goose has dark brown upperparts and brown-barred, pale gray underparts. Emily age 11 25-May-2013 16:48 Neck and legs are long. ROBIN 5. Piping Plover: Small, pale sand-colored plover, showy black bands on head, neck. List of non-native, invasive, and domestic birds not federally protected by Migratory Bird Treat Act laws and found in Tennessee. Mute Swan: Aggressive bird, entirely white, orange bill with large black basal knob and naked black lores. Tail is short. Pacific Loon: This medium-sized loon has a black-and-white checkered back and white underparts. Strong flight with shallow wing beats. Breast is gray, variably barred by dark edges on feathers. Flies in straight line or V formation. Tail is black with strongly contrasting white outer tail feathers. Female has gray-brown upperparts, white underparts with brown streaks, and a light to dark salmon colored belly and vent. The Great Horned Owl is easily the largest owl that nests in Tennessee. The black cap and bib and white cheeks are conspicuous. They are also what many of us think of when we think of owls because they are in so many pictures and seem to be very photogenic. Barnacle Goose: Medium goose, distinctive white face, jet-black head, neck, and upper breast. Tail is black with white undertail coverts. The big, foxy-red Brown Thrasher is a familiar bird over much of the east. Forages on the ground and in low vegetation. Sabine's Gull: Small gull with gray back and white nape, rump, and underparts. The head is brown with brown crown streaks; the back is darker brown with blurry brown streaks. Bill is orange with large black basal knob. Dives for fish and squid. State bird of Maine and Massachusetts. It feeds on small fish, crustaceans and insects. The head is black with white patches around the eyes. Swift direct flight with rapid wing beats. It is home to more than 434 different species of birds. Harlequin Duck: Small diving duck, blue-gray upperparts and underparts, rust-brown flanks. Bill is pink. Head has black hood and throat, sharply contrasting white eyebrow and cheek stripe, and yellow spot in front of eye. Shows white wing patch, black belly, reddish-brown breast, neck and back. Direct flight with rapid wing beats. Wings are dark with thin,white bars. It mainly feeds on insects and other small invertebrates. Long, round-tipped tail is edged with white. White overall with black primaries and long pointed wings. American woodcock The American woodcock is a short-legged, short-tailed, dumpy-looking bird with no apparent neck and a long sharp bill. The tail and legs are long. Bouyant fluttering flight on shallow wing beats. Head appears black overall with white spot behind eye; cap is very dark green. The head is black, and the short black neck has a partial white ring. Wings are brown with two white bars. The bill is dark red. Iridescent throat patch can appear purple, green or black. Vermilion Flycatcher: Small, stocky flycatcher, gray-black upperparts and scarlet-red crown, throat, and underparts. Flies in straight line formation with neck and legs outstretched, roosts high in trees and bushes at night. Dark phase adult has a dark brown body with a large white patch at base of primaries visible in flight. Soars on thermals and updrafts. Bill is dark with a yellow base and slightly decurved. Sanderling: This medium-sized sandpiper has dark-spotted, rufous upperparts and breast, white underparts and black bill, legs and feet. Sometimes it forages boldly on open lawns; more often it scoots into dense cover at any disturbance, hiding among the briar tangles and making loud crackling callnotes. Other Brown Birds . Almost 30 minutes up close and personal with some common birds you'll see in Tennessee. House Wren: Small wren with brown head, nape, and back showing very fine dark brown bars, faint white eyebrows, and gray-brown underparts with fine brown bars on flanks and below tail. Vaguely resembles an ibis. Wings are black-tipped above and black-edged below; tail is deeply forked. Yellow crown is … It mixes in with their summer breeding area as well as their migratory pattern. Feeds on insects, caterpillars, fruits and berries. Bouyant fluttering flight on shallow wing beats. Yellow legs, feet. Yellow-orange eye combs. Tail is black with white edges. Red cap and black chin. Yellow crown is bordered by a wide black cap; cheek and collar are black. All State Birds If you see one in Tennessee please contact Cyndi Routledge at 931-206-3517 with the location. Black bill, legs, feet. Strong direct flight with deep wing beats. Black-bellied Whistling-Duck: Large, colorful duck with bright red bill, pink-red legs and feet. Lives most of its life above timberline. Direct flight on rapid wing beats. The belly is white. Wings are plain gray. The Brown-headed Cowbird is a brood parasite, meaning it lays its eggs in the nests of other species and builds no nest of its own. It has a strong direct flight with deep wing beats. Tail is black and slightly notched. The head has a black crown, white face and throat, and a stout, heavy bill. Yellow-billed Loon: Large loon, white-spotted black upperparts, white underparts, gray sides with fine white spots. Short, bounding flights, alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides. Tennessee Warbler: Small warbler with olive-green upperparts, white underparts, and olive-gray washed sides. It hovers before dipping for prey. What was the SIZE of the Brown Perching-like bird you saw in Tennessee? California Gull: This is a medium-sized gull with a white head and underparts, gray wings and black wing tips. Feeds on seeds, spiders, and insects. Rapid bouncy flight, alternates several quick wing beats with wings pulled to sides. Rapid direct flight with strong wing beats. Sexes are similar. We are new to TN and love it and all the wonderful birds. Dives for small fish and crustaceans. Curlew Sandpiper: This is a medium-sized sandpiper with mottled rufous, white and black upperparts. Strong direct flight. Sexes similar, but male is smaller with a brighter bill base. The head has a black crown, white face and throat, and a stout, heavy bill. It feeds on worms, mice, other birds and their eggs, and garbage. Hovers in display flight and when foraging. Feeds on seeds, buds, fruits and insects. Weak fluttering flight on shallow wing beats. Strong direct flight with shallow wing beats. Direct flight with steady wing beats. Bill is bright yellow; legs and feet are orange. Mottled Duck: Medium dabbling duck with dark brown mottled body, feathers usually show distinct multi-toned chevrons, buff-brown face and unmarked neck, darker crown and eye line. Violet-green Swallow: Small swallow, dark, metallic green upperparts, iridescent purple rump. Feeds on insects, crustaceans, and invertebrates. Sexes are similar. Red-orange legs, feet. Tail is black with white edges. Black legs, feet. Northern Gannet: Very large seabird. Eats mostly insects. North America's only all-white owl. The wings have pale rust-brown patches and black flight feathers. Rump is pale brown, throat and breast are nearly white. The belly is white. Vermilion Flycatcher: Small, stocky flycatcher, gray-black upperparts and scarlet-red crown, throat, and underparts. Flight is swift and direct with rapid wing beats. Eats insects, caterpillars, seeds, fruits and berries. It spends the summers in Canada and is only found in Tennessee during migration. Bill is gray. Head has dark gray cap and sharply contrasting white eyebrow and cheek stripe. Brown coloured birds are found in most families of bird species, including sparrows, thrashers, creepers, and even the females of the different members of the bunting family. Consult our bird identification guide to ID mystery birds in the backyard and beyond. Head and sides of neck are gray, throat is dark red, nape is black-and-white striped. In this environment live “northern” birds such as Common Raven, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Veery, along with warblers including Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, and Canada. Wings are dark with two narrow white bars; tail is black and notched. Wings are dark with broad white edges on feathers. Feeds on aquatic plants, insects and crustaceans. It has a gray crown and nape, red eyes and a slender black bill. Townsend's Solitaire: Small thrush, gray overall and slightly darker above. Head is glossy green-black; neck has black-and-white rings. GREAT TIT 2. Cinnamon Teal: This small duck has scaled dark brown upperparts, cinnamon-brown underparts, head and neck, red eyes, long dark bill and yellow-gray legs. Ross's Goose: Small, white goose with black primary feathers and stubby gray-based red-orange bill. Iceland Gull: Large, white gull, pale, pearl-gray back and upper wings. The head is black with white patches around the eyes. Wings are black with large white patches. Body is rufous-brown with black streaks on the back and sides; white wing patches are visible in flight. Sharp-shinned Hawk Sharp-shinned Hawks have a slate gray back, dark head, and red barring on the chest. Juvenile like winter adult but more black on wing and tail with black tip. This bird is found in Tennessee only briefly, during spring and fall migration; but there is no point in giving it a more descriptive name, because the bird itself is nondescript. The male makes up for his plain appearance with a strident staccato song, surprisingly loud for the size of the bird. The Knoxville Chapter of the Tennessee Ornithological Society (KTOS) initiated the program by donating the publication free to Tennessee educator classrooms and taking students on bird walks to introduce them to the world of birds. Its head and neck is often stained rust-brown from ferrous minerals in marsh soils. The tail is deeply forked and white with dark edged outer feathers. Face is buff with black stripe behind eye. Feeds on insects, caterpillars, fruits and berries. Tail is white with black central feathers. This bird has a really distinct ‘song’ or call. Forages on ground, low in trees and bushes. It shows white wing linings in flight. The rest of Tennessee will only see them while migrating. Black Scoter: Medium diving duck, entirely black except for yellow knob at base of black bill. They nest either in a sheltered location on the ground or low in trees or shrubs. Bullock's Oriole: Medium oriole, mostly bright orange with black crown, eye-line, throat stripe, back, and central tail. Its name reflects its capacity to mimic the calls of other species. The following list is birds NOT protected by federal laws, however there are laws about transport of captive-raised game birds. White face, black cap extends nearly to red eyes. Birds for sale in Tennessee. Direct flight with strong steady wing beats. No sense talking Tennessee birds without acknowledging the Northern Mockingbird, the official state bird. It feeds on aquatic insects and crustaceans. Fish Crow: Medium-sized crow with black body and dark, heavy bill. Legs and feet are gray. And when the winters are more severe unusual birds may be driven from the North and show up here. Feeds on insects, fish, worms, small crustaceans and seeds. They also love orchards, fields, and meadows where weeds are plentiful for food. Feeds on insects, ticks, spiders, lizards, fruits, berries and seeds. Belly; lower back, and rump are yellow-green. They are the only bird known to regularly kill and eat skunks. It has black-spotted and streaked upperparts, slightly scaled underparts, a white eye ring, black bill and yellow legs. Swift flight, alternates rapidly beating wings with brief periods of wings pulled to sides. White-winged Dove: Medium-sized, stout dove with gray-brown upperparts, gray underparts, and small, black crescent below eye. Light buff-yellow wash on crown of head extending down nape may be visible. Swift, powerful undulating flight. Legs and feet are red-orange. There it was - the Rose Breasted Grosbeak! Its plumage blends well among prairie grasses, making it difficult to spot. Very similar to American Crow, but call is different. Alternates rapid wing beats with brief periods of wings pulled to sides. Wings with black tips and black bases of primaries. In comparison, female purple finches are contrasty brown and white birds. The face is pale with finely streaked crown, crisp brown cheek patch, white eyestripe, and gray nape. Diamond-shaped tail has elongated, pointed central feathers. Lower breast and sides are yellow with black streaks and belly is white.Face is yellow with black crown and cheek patch and yellow crescent below eye. Sexes are similar. Strong direct flight on steady wing beats. Brown Thrasher Identification, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Short flights, alternates rapid wing beats with brief periods of wings pulled to sides. Dark morph is dark gray with pale streaks on throat and upper breast. Broad-tailed Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird with green upperparts and flanks, iridescent red throat, and gray underparts. Some brown birds commonly confused with male or female House Sparrows include: American Tree Sparrow, Carolina Wren, Cassin's Finch, Chipping Sparrow, Cowbird, House Wren, Eurasian Tree Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, House Finch, Purple Finch, Rose-breasted Grosbeak (female), Junco, Song Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and even a … Hudsonian Godwit: Large sandpiper with white-scaled, brown-black upperparts, black-barred chestnut-brown underparts. Wings are brown with two white bars. Throat is iridescent violet; bill is long and slightly decurved. They are easily recognized by their large size, ear tufts, and yellow eyes. Adults are 64 cm long and weigh 800 g. They have a black crown and back with the remainder of the body white or grey, red eyes, and short yellow legs. Eats seeds of aquatic plants, grasses and grains, insects and small marine crustaceans. They are the only bird known to regularly kill and eat skunks. The black cap and bib and white cheeks are conspicuous. Brown and red-brown mottled upperparts. The wings are white-edged and white tipped; the legs and feet are pink. Swift, graceful flight, alternates several quick wing beats with long glides. Crown is rufous, throat is white with black stripes, and bill is gray. In 2016 the American Ornithologist Union split the Clapper Rail into three species, the Clapper Rail, Ridgway's Rail and Mangrove Rail (not in North America). ! Flight is direct with rapid wing beats. And when the winters are more severe unusual birds may be driven from the North and show up here. Bill is yellow, red spot at tip of lower mandible. Glaucous Gull: This large white gull has a pale gray back and yellow eyes. Short-billed Dowitcher: This large sandpiper has mottled gray, black, brown and red-brown upperparts, white rump, red-brown underparts with spots and bars, a long, straight dark bill and long, dark yellow-green legs. Arctic Tern: This is a medium-sized, slim tern with gray upperparts, black cap, a white rump and throat, and pale gray underparts. The female is more brightly colored than the male. White-winged Crossbill: Medium crossbill, bright pink overall except for black wings with two bold white wing-bars. Flies in straight line formation. Female has gray-brown upperparts, white underparts with brown streaks, and a light to dark salmon colored belly and vent. Long bill, gray and spatulate. Sharp-tailed Sandpiper: This medium-sized sandpiper has dark brown upperparts and white underparts with faint olive-brown streaks on breast and sides. In 2012-13, the Discover Birds Program reached 394 Tennessee students. Tennessee Watchable Wildlife - 100 Common Birds of Tennessee | Downy Woodpecker. Dark wings with white wing bar. Feeds on aquatic plants collected from bottom. To see this please jump to the Iceland Gull species account. Wings are brown. The Knoxville Chapter of the Tennessee Ornithological Society (KTOS) initiated the program by donating the publication free to Tennessee educator classrooms and taking students on bird walks to introduce them to the world of birds. The best bird guide and bird watching search engine to identify birds in the world. So, when they come here they are flying south for the winter, as far as they are concerned. Ring-necked Pheasant: This large chicken-like pheasant has a metallic-brown body, iridescent green head, white neck ring, red eye patch and wattles, and a long pointed tail. Swift bounding flight, alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides. These birds are easy to spot with their sharp black and gray plumage, especially when there is snow on the ground. Swift direct flight with rapid wing beats. East and west coast birds are heavier barred and spotted, paler underparts and often show white bellies. Flies in straight line or V formation. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats. Underwings are dark. Feeds higher on the beach than other plovers. Black bill, legs, feet. Flight is swift and undulating on shallow rapid wing beats. White tail has diagnostic black inverted T. Wings have chestnut-brown bars. Black cap covers eyes, crosses chin and ends at yellow nape. Brown Thrashers are exuberant singers, with one of the largest repertoires of any North American songbird. She was thefirst girl in Brown family after five boys. Bill is gray. Bill is black with yellow tip; legs and feet are black. Anna's Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird; male has bronze-green upperparts, dull gray underparts. Weak fluttering flight with shallow wing beats. Forages on ground for seeds, insects, larvae and caterpillars. Diet includes insects and crustaceans. Baird's Sandpiper: This medium-sized bird has scaled gray-brown upperparts, white underparts and a dark-spotted gray-brown breast. It has a buoyant, zigzag flight, alternating several rapid wing beats. Wings are dark gray with two rust-brown bars. Bill, legs and feet are black. Legs and feet are gray. Tail is dark gray with white corners. Other Brown Birds . Black legs, webbed feet. It flies in a straight line formation. A plain brown bird with an effervescent voice, the House Wren is a common backyard bird over nearly the entire Western Hemisphere. Garganey: This small dabbling duck has black-streaked, gray upperparts, chestnut-brown mottled face and breast, pale gray flanks, and a white stripe above the eye that runs down the neck. 37. Flies low over water with strong rapid wing beats. Sexes are similar. Barrow's Goldeneye: Medium diving duck with black upperparts, contrasting white shoulder bars, white underparts.