The plant is naturally variable in form and there exist about 10 varieties of the species. No known serious insect or disease problems. It is cross between S. japonica ‘Alpina’ and S. japonica ‘Goldflame’ (parents originally described as S. japonica var. Goldmound Spirea is recommended for the following landscape applications; Goldmound Spirea will grow to be about 3 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 4 feet. In the wild, it is difficult to control its spread. Also, trimming spirea back, in many cases, will induce a second bloom. Growing Gold Mound Spirea Shrubs. Remove any dead branches and use this trimming to shape the shrub. They are exceptionally hardy and are regularly used in landscapes where a tough-as-nails plant is needed. Goldmound spirea flowering shrub is ideal as a hedge accent or for mass planting, and makes a beautiful contrast to dark-green shrubs. Once established, they can tolerate dry soils and some drought. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. In late spring, flat sprays of small pink flowers are on display. Spirea japonica ‘Goldmound’ This spirea us an upright, compact low growing one withyellow-green in the spring and then changes to a lime green color once summer arrives. Goldmound Spirea is a cultivar deciduous shrub in the rose family with characteristically golden colored leaves. Compact shrub produces prized, vibrant golden foliage accented with clusters of pink flowers in the spring, yellow-green foliage … Fall color may include interesting yellows, oranges and reds. Tolerates light shade. Spireas are some of the most popular of all deciduous landscape shrubs, and no variety is more useful or prized than 'Goldflame' (Spiraea japonica 'Goldflame'). Zones: 4-7. Flowers on new wood, so prune in late winter to early spring if needed. Tolerates a wide range of soils. Spiraea japonica, commonly called Japanese spirea, is a dense, upright, mounded, deciduous shrub that typically grows 4-6’ tall with a slightly larger spread. is a garden staple, like baguettes on a French dining table or Shakespeare on your bookshelf. grower pot; Best grown in USDA hardiness zones-4 to zones-8; Mature size is 3 tall and 4 wide; Bright golden-yellow foliage in spring with pink flower clusters in late spring and Summer; Responds well to late winter or spring pruning; Performs best in … It is native to Japan, China, and K… Remove 50% to 75% of the top of the shrub maintaining a mounded form. Pruning is optional if suckers start to form on the plant or you wish to maintain a tight and compact structure for spireas planted in small spaces. Related Products. Includes 1 Spirea Goldmound in a 2.25 Gal. This is a compact mounded cultivar that grows to 42” tall and to 48” wide. Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. © Copyright 2015 Green Thumb Garden Centre. Fall color may include yellows, oranges and reds. Spirea is considered one of the easiest-to-grow shrubs with dense, weather-resistant foliage patterns and colorful seasonal blooms. Flowers are attractive to butterflies.Genus name comes from the Greek word speira meaning wreath in reference to the showy flower clusters seen on most shrubs in the genus.Specific epithet means of Japan, which is part of its native range.‘Gold Mound’ is, as the cultivar name suggests, noted for its attractive golden foliage. Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Late winter is best time to prune and spirea are a bit different than other shrubs. This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter … Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Mass or group in shrub border. Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. The botanical name of goldflame spirea is Spiraea japonica. Spirea Common Name: Spirea. Prune these shrubs in early spring before they leaf out. Incorporates well into foundation plantings. One of the best of the low growing, deciduous shrubs. It tends to fill out right to the ground and therefore doesn't necessarily require facer plants in front. In some areas of North America, the long-lasting seeds of this plant are making it difficult to restore native vegetation. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America. The fruit is not ornamentally significant. Prefers rich, moist loams. can be used as specimen plants, hedges, foundation plantings and borders. Spiraea japonica 'Goldmound' is another commonly seen foundation shrub. Low hedge for path and walkways. The Gold Mound Spirea is a small shrub that grows 2 to 3 feet tall and 3 or 4 feet wide. Use as a specimen or plant in mass. Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Falls into two categories, spring-blooming and summer-blooming with white or carmine-pink flowers Many of these produce flowers right after pruning. Bloom time: Late spring through midsummer. Spirea are easy to care for shrubs that produce an abundance of colorful flowers and foliage throughout the summer. The small serrated pointy leaves are highly ornamental and turn an outstanding red in the fall. As with other late-spring flowering shrubs, prune "Goldmound" spirea in late winter to early spring before new growth begins. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. Spirea japonica 'Goldmound' Striking yellow/golden foliage with bright pink bloom, excellent color contrast, reliable rebloomer, foliage shows hints of bronze in autumn. Specimen or group for rock gardens. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. alpina and S. x bumalda‘Goldflame’). Goldmound Spirea is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Some of the popular spireas are spiraea arguta, billardii, bumalda, goldflame, golden princess, japonica anthony waterer, japonica shirobana, little princes, snowmound, and thunbergii. This is an easy-care plant that has a good tolerance for clay soils, urban pollutio… Answered by shelley on May 14, 2015 Certified Expert . 'Goldmound' Spirea. I'll show you 4 options for pruning spirea to get the effect you want. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. Summer-blooming s… Spiraea japonica 'Goldmound' Sku #1198 Vibrant golden spring foliage, accented by clusters of pink flowers, cools to a yellowish green in summer then a rich, yellowish orange in fall. Tolerates light shade. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. The shade of spirea flowers ranges from pink to bright, white hues. It has attractive gold foliage throughout the season. An impressive garden shrub for color effect, featuring light gold foliage which emerges bronze, turning red in fall, and flat-topped clusters of pink flowers in early summer; ideal size for garden detail use, forms a dense, compact ball, neat and tidy. Its size makes it perfect for using as a single plant in smaller gardens or beds, or for grouping in clusters of three, five, seven or more plants in larger spaces. Heavy pruning should be done in winter at the time when the plant is not actively growing. Grow in full sun for best bloom and foliage color. Noted for its brilliant foliage, Spiraea japonica 'Gold Mound' (Japanese Spirea) is a compact, spreading deciduous shrub with golden yellow ovate leaves in spring, fading to greenish-yellow as the summer progresses. Plants can be aggressive self-seeders, and have escaped gardens and naturalized in many areas of the eastern U.S. Plants will also spread in the garden by suckering. It is a hybrid cross between S. japonica ‘Alpina’ and S. japonica ‘Goldflame’. Want to find a flowering bush to plant that will not lose its foliage. A good substitution, that offers a beautiful fall color not typical of spirea, is the Tor spirea- Spiraea betulifolia 'Tor' . More drastically cutting back spirea should occur in the fall or in late winter to early spring. The Garden wouldn't be the Garden without our Members, Donors and Volunteers. Pruning Spirea Japonica is required to keep it in appropriate shape or size. Height and spread: 1½ to 2½ feet tall & wide. Prefers rich, moist loams. Pruning Spirea Japonica. Remove faded flower clusters as practicable (light shearing is an option) to encourage additional bloom. Valued for their easy care and profuse floral displays, spireas (Spiraea spp.) Leaves emerge golden in spring, but gradually fade to a gold-green as the summer progresses. Does spirea lose its leaves in winter. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. Tolerates a wide range of soils. Spiraea japonica. Fertilizer Needs: Apply a balanced fertilizer in early spring (before signs of new growth). The foliage turns lovely shades of orange, red and yellow in the fall. Do mulching to preserve moisture as growing spirea requires slightly moist soil. Pink flowers are added to the color palette in May and June. This exquisite little spirea may have the most colorful foliage around, emerging candy-apple red in the spring and maturing to yellow and pumpkin orange as the season progresses. The exception would be to do renewal pruning, meaning cutting … Remove faded flower clusters as practicable (light shearing is an option) to encourage additional bloom. It grows at a fast rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 20 years. Spirea comes in variable sizes , depending upon cultivarTypically 2 to 3 feet high and 3 to 5 feet wide, but some cultivars can go up to 5 to 6 feet high and wide. Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Leaves (to 3” long) are oval and sharply-toothed. If your spirea bloom in the spring, They are likely Spiraea prunifolia or Spiraea x vanhouttei and they bloom on "old wood" or the previous year's growth.These should be cut back after blooming in 2016. Other shrubs may give you better flowers or more striking fall foliage, but this one excels in spring foliage. Small pink flowers in flattened corymbs (to 3” across) appear in late spring. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. Plants: Perennials, Shrubs, Trees, Evergreens and more... Compost, Soils, Mulch & Fertilizer: Bagged & Bulk. Spireas are generally susceptible to many of the diseases and insects that attack other rose family members, including leaf spot, fire blight, powdery mildew, root rot, aphids, leaf roller and scale. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter … A flowering shrub like other members of the spirea group, 'Goldflame' is particularly beloved for its yellow-gold foliage that offers contrast to the predominant greens found in most landscape shrubs. Shipping. Gold Mound spirea is a deciduous shrub that is prized for its bright golden leaves in spring, which turn a brilliant yellow in autumn. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. The extreme adaptability of Spiraea japonica is no more considered as a beneficial feature. Spirea Pink (summer blooming), includes A. W., Daphne, Dolchica, Goldflame, Goldmound, Limemoumd, Little Princess, Magic Carpet, Neon Flash, Norman, Shirobana and Japanese White. How to Prune Spirea Bushes It has no significant negative characteristics. The products I use - https://kit.com/HortTube This video is a detailed description of Goldmound Spirea. Spring-blooming, white-flowered spireas are generally called bridal wreath spireas. Arching branches bear abundant flowers before the leaves emerge. Shop 2.5-gallon pink goldmound spirea flowering shrub in pot (l14289) in the shrubs section of Lowes.com Compact in habit, this shrub boasts showy small pink flowers that appear in late spring and attract butterflies. Tolerate: Deer, Erosion, Clay Soil, Air Pollution. Where is this species invasive in the US. The brilliant light chartreuse-green foliage on the Goldmound Spirea holds its color all season long. The Goldmound Spirea responds well to rejuvenation and is recommended to do so in late winter to very early spring. Goldmound has vibrant golden spring foliage that cools to a yellowish green in summer then a rich, yellowish orange in fall. The Goldmound Spirea, Spiraea japonica 'Goldmound', is a colorful plant that provides an exceptional accent or contrast in your foundation planting or shrub border. Spireas are hardy plants that need minimal care but a few precautions should be taken during the winter season. Spirea pruning not only rejuvenates the plant and encourages blooming, but it also helps to restrain the size of the shrub. Great color addition to the shrub or perennial border or for brightening the container garden. This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter … Goldmound Spirea is blanketed in stunning clusters of rose flowers at the ends of the branches from late spring to early summer. Depending on the species, shrubs range from 2 to 3 feet tall and about as wide to about 10 feet tall and 10 to 20 feet wide. This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter … This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter … Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. The flowers are clusters of light pink flowers in early summer which repeat sparsely for the rest of the season. Tiny pink flowers in flat-topped clusters (corymbs) cover the foliage from late spring to mid-summer, with sparse and intermittent repeat bloom sometimes occurring. Cutting it way back will stimulate new growth in tighter clusters so that you can get a more rounded, compact shrub shape. Plants can be aggressive self-seeders, and have escaped gardens and naturalized in many areas of the eastern U.S. Plants will also spread in the garden by suckering. The flowers of Japanese (japonica spirea) ones occur after trimming during late winter. Flowers on new wood, so prune in late winter to early spring if needed. ... Autumn/Winter Care: Cut back lightly during winter if needed. As the Goldmound Spirea blooms on new wood, plants should be pruned in late winter to early spring as needed. This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Other varieties of spirea, such as Japanese spirea, respond better to pruning in the late winter months. Spirea (Spirea spp.) It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn't be allowed to dry out. Here are some articles on evergreen shrubs that will offer you many choices to choose from: Spirea Goldmound ships as plants in 3.5 inch pots. Flushes of … You can prune dead, diseased, damaged or overgrown branches at any season. Orders shipping to CA and AZ will be bare rooted before being prepped for shipping. A. Spirea lose their leaves every year so they are considered deciduous and not evergreen.